The Brown Foundation Institute of Molecular Medicine for the Prevention of Human Diseases

 Charles Cox, Jr., MD

Charles Cox, Jr., MD

Children’s Fund Distinguished Professor
Director of the Pediatric Trauma Program at Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital
Department of Pediatric Surgery
Professor, Center for Stem Cell & Regenerative Medicine

Charles.S.Cox@uth.tmc.edu

713-500-7307

Dr. Charles S. Cox, Jr., is the Children’s Fund, Inc. Distinguished Professor of Pediatric Surgery and directs the Pediatric Surgical Translational Laboratories and Pediatric Program in Regenerative Medicine at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston.  He directs the Pediatric Trauma Program at the University of Texas-Houston/Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital in the Texas Medical Center.

A Texas native, Dr. Cox received his undergraduate degree from the University of Texas at Austin in the Plan II Liberal Arts Honors Program.  Upon graduating from the University of Texas Medical Branch, he completed his Surgery residency at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston.  Further post-graduate fellowships were completed in Pediatric Surgery at the University of Michigan, an NIH T32 sponsored clinical and research fellowship in cardiopulmonary support/circulatory support devices/bio-hybrid organs at the Shriner’s Burns Institute, and Surgical Critical Care/Trauma at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston.  He is certified by the American Board of Surgery in Surgery, with added qualifications in Pediatric Surgery and Surgical Critical Care.

The Pediatric Translational Laboratories and Pediatric Program in Regenerative Medicine is a multi-disciplinary effort that addresses problems that originate with traumatic injury and the consequences of resuscitation and critical care.  The Program focuses on progenitor cell based therapy (stem cells) for traumatic brain injury, and related neurological injuries (hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, stroke, spinal cord injury), recently completing the first acute, autologous cell therapy treatment Phase I study for traumatic brain injury in children (Neurosurgery, 2011). Three subsequent INDs have been approved for cell-based therapies for neurological injury. The program also develops novel bio-hybrid organs using cell-based and tissue engineering approaches to trauma and injury related problems.  These efforts have recently resulted in two IND based cell therapeutic studies, and three patents in the past two years.  The program is funded through the National Institutes of Health, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board/Emerging Technology Funds, Industry Collaboration, and philanthropic contributions.  The Program is housed in state-of-the-art laboratory facilities (4500 sf), and includes two cGMP facilities for the production of clinical grade cell and tissue products: Hoffberger Cellular Therapeutics Laboratory and the Griffin Stem Cell

Therapeutics Research Laboratory

            Dr. Cox has served on scientific study sections/review groups for the National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Veterans Affairs MERIT Awards, Department of Defense, Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs, as well as National Research Programs in Canada, Singapore, Spain, and the Czech Republic.  He is the author of over 120 scientific publications, 20 book chapters, and is the editor of a text entitled, Progenitor Cell Therapy for Neurological Injury.

Publications

1.      Cox CS, Baumgartner JE, Harting MT, Worth L, Walker PA, Shah SK, Ewing-Cobbs L, Hasen K, Day MC, Lee D, Jimenez F, Gee A.  2010.  Phase 1 clinical trial of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells for severe traumatic brain injury in children.  Neurosurgery 68: 588-600, 2011PMC Journal – In Process.

2.      Walker PA, Shah SK, Jimenez F, Gerber MH, Xue H, Cutrone R, Hamilton JA, Mays RW, Deans RA, Pati S, Dash PK, Cox CS.  Intravenous multipotent adult progenitor cell therapy for traumatic brain injury: Preserving the blood-brain barrier via interaction with splenocytes.  Exp Neurol 225:341-352, 2010.

3.      Walker PA, Baumgartner JE, Fletcher S, Strobel N, Cox CS.  Modern approaches to pediatric brain injury therapy.  J Trauma 67:S120-127, 2009.  PMC Journal – In Process.

4.      Harting MT, Jimenez F, Adams SD, Mercer DW, Cox CS.  Acute, regional inflammatory response after traumatic brain injury: Implications for cellular therapy.  Surgery 144: 803-813, 2008.  PMC Journal – In Process.

5.      Ewing-Cobbs L, Prasad MR, Swank P, Kramer L, Cox CS, Fletcher JM, Barnes M, Zhang X, Hasan KM.  Arrested development and disrupted callosal microstructure following pediatric traumatic brain injury.  Neuroimage 42:1305-1315, 2008.  PMCID: PMC2615227

6.      Walker P, Harting MT, Jimenez F, Pati S, Dash PK, Cox CS.  Direct intrathecal implantation of mesenchymal stromal cells leads to enhanced neuroprotection via an NF?β mediated increase in IL-6 production.  Stem Cells Dev.19: 867-876, 2010.  PMC Journal – In Process.

7.      Harting MT, Sloan LE, Jimenez F, Baumgartner JE, Cox CS.  Subacute neural stem cell therapy for traumatic brain injury.  J Surg Res 153:188-194, 2009.  PMC Journal – In Process.

8.      Harting MT, Jimenez F, Xue H, Fischer UM, Baumgartner JE, Dash PK, Cox CS.  Intravenous mesenchymal stem cell therapy for traumatic brain injury?  J Neurosurgery 110:1189-1199, 2009.  PMC Journal – In Process.

9.      Harting MT, Baumgartner JE, Worth LL, Ewing-Cobbs L, Gee A, Day MC, Cox CS.  Cellular therapies for traumatic brain injury.  Neurosurg Focus 24(3-4):E18, Review, 2008.  PMC Journal – In Process.