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Course Requirements


Molecular Area Requirement

A thorough understanding of biochemistry is an essential ingredient in the education of a biomedical scientist. The following information is provided to help you decide which course(s) would be most appropriate for you given your particular background and research interests. Your Dean's Office Advisor will help you with this decision.

GS02 1014 Fundamental Biological Principles of Molecular Imaging and Therapeutics. Spring, annually. This course covers the biological principles that form the basis for molecular imaging and therapeutics. It is an introductory course that assumes that the student has completed at least one year of general chemistry and, preferably, at least one semester of biology. It is further assumed that the student has a firm understanding of calculus and ordinary differential equations. Topics covered include the fundamental aspects of biochemistry, cell biology, and cancer biology needed to appreciate and understand critical concepts in the applications of modern molecular imaging and therapeutics. Applications and examples of key concepts to molecular imaging and/or therapeutics are provided throughout the course. The course is designed for students in the Medical Physics Program, but is also open to students in other programs who are in need of an introduction to molecular and cellular biology.

OR

GS03 1015 Metabolic Biochemistry. Fall, annually. This course addresses molecular biology, physical biochemistry, metabolism, and biochemistry of cellular constituents at the graduate level through lectures and small group conferences. Emphasis will be on regulation at the molecular level and quantitative description of biochemical events. Students are expected to have a good foundation in biochemistry before enrolling in this class.

OR

GS03 1024 Topics in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Spring, annually. A survey of currently active areas in biochemistry and molecular biology, covering at an advanced level the structure-function relationships of the major classes of biomolecules and subcellular organelles, as well as aspects of metabolism in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Requirement for students in the Programs in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Genes and Development, and Microbiology and Molecular Genetics.

OR

GS04 1113 Molecular Biology of Cancer. Spring, odd years. Prerequisite: Basic Concepts of Tumor Biology (GS041083) or consent of course coordinator. This course covers fundamental molecular biology processes with an emphasis on how normal mechanisms of genome maintenance, gene expression, signaling, and metabolism become misregulated during cancer development. The course is divided into three modules: i) DNA structure, repair, and mutagenesis, ii) regulation of gene expression and chromatin dynamics, and iii) cell signaling and metabolism. Lectures on DNA structure, replication, transcription, and protein translation provide basic introductory material that is built upon in other lectures focused on various DNA repair pathways and epigenetic mechanisms regulating chromatin structure and function. Signaling and metabolic pathways important for cancer development are also included as course topics. Assigned reading material will come from the primary literature and be discussed in class. This course is designed to fulfill the molecular area requirement. This course is taught at the UT Science Park in Smithville, Texas.

OR

GS04 1123 Molecular Biology of Eukaryotic Cells. Spring, annually. This is an advanced molecular genetics course in which current results and theories, based on primary journal articles, will be discussed. The primary emphasis will be on the transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The effect of chromatin conformation, RNA splicing and 3' sequences on gene expression will also be discussed. Requirement for students in the Program in Genes and Development.

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GS07 1063 Microbial Molecular Genetics. Fall, annually. This course is an introductory graduate level course that provides the students with broad knowledge in molecular genetics, with an emphasis on molecular genetics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes. Topics covered include gene and genome organization, gene expression, genetic mechanisms and genetic experimental strategies. The course is recommended for, but not limited to first-year students.

OR

GS13 1024 Molecular Basis of Cell Signaling.  Spring, annually.  This course provides a detailed exploration of the molecular basis of cell signaling with emphasis on recent developments, structure-function, and quantitation.  The course includes both the regulation of second messenger systems (GPCRs, G proteins, cAMP, IP3 and lipid), ion channels, growth factor regulated tyrosine kinases, small G proteins (fas, GEFs, GAPs), kinase/phosphatase pathways, steroid hormones/transcription, and the modeling of these systems.

OR

GS14 1063 Molecular Neurobiology.  Fall, annually.  This course is a graduate level treatment of the molecular, cellular and biochemical events that underlie neuronal function  Emphasis is placed on the basic chemistry and biology of cells residing in the nervous system.  The course also covers the structure and function of receptors, channels and pumps necessary for neuronal function and the neurochemistry of specific transmitter systems.  The maturation of the central nervous system is taught at the cellular level along with a discussion of the diseases of the nervous system focusing on the molecular aspects of the disease process.  The intent is to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the workings of cells generally and neurons specifically.